Good news for postmenopausal women with a high risk of breast cancer

16 April 2020

As an oncology nurse Lorrie Kurth has seen the effects of breast cancer first-hand.

Lorrie has a high risk of breast cancer. She has lost her grandmother, her mother and a cousin to the disease, another cousin has had breast cancer and so has an aunt.

Ten years ago, Lorrie joined the anastrozole medical prevention trial to help researchers find a way to prevent the disease.

“It’s was such a good opportunity to help other generations of my family and other families”.

At the time of enrolling in the trial, Lorrie knew that it could take 10 years for the trial to determine whether the drug would help prevent breast cancer.

Ten years have now passed and the long-term results of using anastrozole for breast cancer prevention were published recently and its good news for wāhine like Lorrie that are at high risk of breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS).

The results show that anastrozole maintains a preventative effect for postmenopausal women at high risk of breast cancer for at least 12 years.

Anastrozole inhibits the production of oestrogen in postmenopausal women and has been used for several years now in the treatment of postmenopausal women with oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

The use of anastrozole, which is part of a class of drugs called aromatase inhibitors, is more effective than tamoxifen in women who have already had breast cancer.

This research shows that anastrozole is a safe drug in the long-term and provides women with greater options when it comes to managing their risk. Other options include regular breast screening, preventative surgery and a healthy lifestyle.  

Lorrie has not been diagnosed with breast cancer, she is in good health and has never dwelled on her higher chances of getting the disease. “It’s not something I spend a lot of time thinking about. I work on the theory that if it happens, I’ll deal with it then. “I have had excellent surveillance throughout the trial, particularly with my family history, and this has been very comforting.”

Lorrie is philosophical about cancer and death because of her years of working as an oncology nurse. “I’ve learned from looking after people with cancer that you have to live every day and make the most of that day.”